Wednesday, 23 July 2014

That nervous feeling

I'd like to take a different turn in the topic of my post today, as I know a few people who are/have been feeling the heat and it's getting them down. Okay, so a nervous feeling you get is from certain activities that make you feel a little scared or anxious, e.g. when realising a deadline for a report is due within the next week and you have done little to complete it, or you have a public speech to make and have difficulties in public speaking. However, these nerves are okay and nothing to particularly worry about (without nerves something is going wrong!). It is only when those nerves start to overwhelm the body and take control of day to day activities and this can lead to developing stress. Signs of stress could involve a loss/gain of appetite thus resulting in a weight loss/gain, a change in sleeping pattern by having too much/little sleep, a lack of concentration can be developed from stress.

So question is, how do we control that nervous feeling? Yes, a little bit of nerves here and there are good, they make us feel anxious but in an excited way. However, whether you chose to ignore the situation or make best of it will then have an impact on how your stress levels will change. Here are a few things that may help:

1. Procrastination is bad! If these nerves are from an uncompleted paper/project, don't sit around worrying about it, get it done! You count the days until the deadline, e.g a week, you have plenty of time to complete it ( 7 days, that's at least 84 hours with sleep in the routine).

2. BREATHE! Just take a step back and look at the situation you are in because most of the time it is simply your head telling you things are going bad, but that's just the over thinking of the situation. Break the situation down into little chunks and then you will realise that you can do it!

3. 'Public Speaking', don't them words sound daunting?!?! I personally shudder every time I hear those words put together! For many people public speaking is a difficult practice to carry out, and even harder if the solution is to panic. The first step to overcome the fright, know what you're talking about. It is important to remember the main points to the topic of your speech. By simply writing your speech then breaking it down into bullet points and memorizing the points it will be easier to improvise words around the ideas (remember it isn't a screenplay so you don't have to write a script!). A vital part to memorizing the ideas is to go over all the points before you sleep, this way your brain process and stores the important information.
*hint: don't drink alcohol because this will kill brain cells and potentially important information and it will also do nothing to help calm nerves*

Just remember to stay calm, keep breathing and get on with it! Here is a picture of a lake, look how calm it looks - BE THIS CALM!

Peace out!

Snowdonia